Housing

One of the key parts of the American dream was to be able to find a job that paid well enough for you to live in your own house or apartment. However the ability of people to afford their own living space, particularly in the Bronx and Westchester, is getting increasingly more difficult. While housing prices have risen, wages have stagnated, and young people step out of college with way too much debt to be able to afford their own place which leaves them to be stuck at home - almost 23% of millennials live with their parents, up from 13% in 2005.

 

The rent IS too damn high. Rising rent prices have been a problem for years, but now half of Americans are rent-burdened, or pay more than 30% of their income in rent or housing costs. Proposals that seek to provide tax-breaks to those who are rent burdened are well-intended, but do not address the root of the problem, which is a lack of housing supply. In order to combat this, the government needs to invest in public housing so that there are more places for people to live.

 

Ending homelessness. On any given night in America there are 600,000 homeless people, and 12 million empty homes. We can help end homelessness and get people who are severely rent-burdened back on their feet by finding them good places to live. There is no moral justification for having more than half a million homeless people while millions of home sit empty, we can solve this problem with political will.

 

Properly fund HUD. The department of Housing and Urban Development has seen a significant decrease in funding in recent years that has harmed its ability to properly address the housing crisis. If Congress is serious about fighting soaring housing/rent costs and homelessness then it needs to properly fund HUD.

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